I’m an endlessly picky and particular comic book fan. I have Ideas and Opinions, and that often means I’ll read fewer books. But, I think, it also means I find some absolute gems in the books I do read. In this case, I want to talk about the “Tomorrow Never Learns” story arc in Wolverine and the X-Men vol. 2.

I read TNL for the first time in early 2015, pretty much as soon as the arc went live on Marvel Unlimited, Marvel’s back-issue e-library subscription service. I was pretty new to comics, and this was the penultimate arc of Wolverine and the X-Men, the first comic book series I ever read the full run of. I absolutely loved characters like Quentin “Kid Omega” Quire, Idie “Oya” Okonkwo, and Evan “Genesis” Sabahnur and their classmates, already, but it was this arc that solidified something for me:

Idie, Evan, and Quentin are a tipping point, not just for the X-Men, not just for mutantkind, but for the X-Men comics themselves, and this is intrinsically linked to the fact that they — all three of them — are in love with each other, or will be by the end of the story.

This is the first in my ongoing series of essay-length posts about the craft, content, and themes present in different pieces of geek media. This first essay is about the XMCU, airing my grievances about its chronology problem.


The X-Men Cinematic Universe has not been a shining example of consistency in superhero movie franchises. There have been three characters called Angel, only two of which are versions of Warren Worthington III, two Jubilees, two different Bolivar Trasks, and no solid grasp on when Scott Summers was born.

That said, most of these problems don’t become apparent until X-Men: Days of Future Past, and I want to argue that Bryan Singer is the man who ruined the XMCU’s internal coherence, mainly through negligence and an inability to recognize how time travel works. Singer’s return to the franchise lead to several temporal impossibilities, and while telling a story involving time travel can be complicated, the mistakes made here are really basic.