I’m an endlessly picky and particular comic book fan. I have Ideas and Opinions, and that often means I’ll read fewer books. But, I think, it also means I find some absolute gems in the books I do read. In this case, I want to talk about the “Tomorrow Never Learns” story arc in Wolverine and the X-Men vol. 2.

I read TNL for the first time in early 2015, pretty much as soon as the arc went live on Marvel Unlimited, Marvel’s back-issue e-library subscription service. I was pretty new to comics, and this was the penultimate arc of Wolverine and the X-Men, the first comic book series I ever read the full run of. I absolutely loved characters like Quentin “Kid Omega” Quire, Idie “Oya” Okonkwo, and Evan “Genesis” Sabahnur and their classmates, already, but it was this arc that solidified something for me:

Idie, Evan, and Quentin are a tipping point, not just for the X-Men, not just for mutantkind, but for the X-Men comics themselves, and this is intrinsically linked to the fact that they — all three of them — are in love with each other, or will be by the end of the story.

So, if you follow me on Twitter, you probably saw me flip my shit earlier today about Deadly Skies, a 2006 sci fi disaster movie about an asteroid on a collision course with Earth. Literally the only thing separating it from every other movie of its type is the fact that the main characters are a black woman and and a gay man.

It’s not super well-made, with some juvenile editing choices at times — and some shots that are framed the way a lot of my classmates in college would have framed them. The dialogue is often very bad. The first act moves too slowly; the third act, a little too fast.

But it’s comfortable. It takes the tropes of the genre and points directly at me and people like me, saying, “THESE ARE FOR YOU TOO.”